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20131202
20131210
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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
an umbrella. i'm a woman. i'm an immigrant. i am hispanic. i don't qualify for aarp membership yet. and i am a republican. i am an endangered species right sadly now. , i often get asked how can you possibly be a republican? why are you a republican? the explanation lies in my personal history. my family story shapes my views. i came here in 1980. i was born in nicaragua. there was a communist revolution. the sandinistas came to power in 1979 after a three-year bloody civil war. it turned out the sandinistas were also communists. they quickly went about creating communism in our little country. my parents were not fans of repression or censorship or redistribution of wealth at that point they made the decision of getting out of nicaragua. my father stayed behind and became a contra, a nicaraguan freedom fighter. when your father is struggling to bring freedom back to your country, you realize at an early age that politics matters. election results matter. being a bystander is not an option. being involved is what you must do. i became a republican the night i heard ronald reagan addressing t
their hands and to fix our broken immigration system. mr. speaker, last summer republicans and democrats in the senate came together and passed comprehensive immigration reform with a strong bipartisan vote, a vote of 68 to 32. 68-32. that's like a superduper majority. in fact, one poll last month showed that 63% of americans, 2/3 of americans, support a path to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. business leaders, chambers of commerce, labor unions, faith groups, immigrant families, law enforcement officials, and americans of every race, creed, color, and ethnicity all across our country applauded our senators for reaching across the aisle. for many it really gave hope and belief in our government that we are still capable of putting aside political posturing and to build consensus around the difficult issues that face our country. but today as i speak americans are asking, what happened? they are confused as to why the house of representatives can't do the same thing that the senate did and pass immigration reform. they are even more confused as to why the house can't even dignify
a woman, i'm an immigrant, i'm hispanic. i don't qualify for aarp membership yet. and i am a republican. sadly, i'm an endangered species right now. and i often get asked how can you possibly be a republican? why are you a republican? the explanation lies in my personal history. my family's story is what shaped my political views. i came here in 1980. i was born in nicaragua. there was a communist revolution, the sandinistas came to power in 1979 after a three-year, bloody civil war. it turned out the sandinistas were also communists. by the way, i don't know if you know a sandinista got elected mayor in new york, and they quickly went about instituting communism in our little country. my parents were not fans of redistribution of wealth, and at that point they made the decision of getting out of nicaragua. my father stayed behind, he became a contra, a freedom fighter. and when your father's a guerrilla struggling to bring freedom back the your country, you realize at an early age that politics matter. election results matter. being a bystander is not an option. being involved is what
for the nearly 6,000 syrians with approved immigrant petitions to the united states. as hundreds of millions around the world prepare to celebrate the most joyful day of the christian calendar, the international community must intensify its efforts to end this terrible war and also to protect syria's christians and to ensure the continued vitality of this 2,000-year-old community. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. speaker, the innovativeness of american enterprise flies off the radar. according to amazon c.e.o., the company is fixing to deliver packages to its customers via drones. it's called amazon prime air. that's right. in just a few years, he says people will be able to order something online and have it in their hands within 30 minutes by the use of drones. sounds like something out of the "jetsons" doesn't it? soon there will be a drone to replace the mail carrier. according to amazon, these packages will deliver up to five pounds. mr. speaker, thousands of americans use amaz
because it's excluding the undocumented immigrant and it's excluding the unborn baby, so we begin to bristle at that. and secondly we said, and wait a minute, we who are pretty -- we catholics who are kind of among the pros when it comes to providing health care do it because of our religious conviction and because of the dictates of our conscience and now we're being asked to violate some of those. so that's when we began to worry and drawback and say mr. president, please, you're really kind of -- you're really kind of pushing aside some of your greatest supporters here. >> congressman, as a catholic do you agree with that? the cardinal went on to say they have been on the front end of this, i think he threw out 1919, trying to get our government to take up what it means to have health care in this country. but do you think that catholic supporters are going to hear the cardinal there and say, you know what, maybe i don't think so highly of obama care. >> i just hope that all supporters of all faiths listen to the pope. i think he's the most terrific voice that i've heard in my
spent time with his uncle who's had some immigration problems. they said before that he had never met with them. it turned out that when he first went to harvard law school he stayed at his home for a couple of weeks. they said, well, why did you tell us before that he hadn't and now you tell us he has? the answer was, well, we didn't ask him before. it's an odd way to get information. >> you have been in that anchor seat for a decade, chris. congratulations. your anniversary is coming up. >> thank you. it's been the dream job of my career. look at that. that's depressing. ronald regan used to say seeing himself in old movies was like seeing a son he never knew he had. >> chris, i have to say something to you, a compliment. look at the head of hair you have, then and now. you've got a good head of hair, mister. >> the only thing out of date there is the suit. >> thank you. it's all mine. i appreciate that, khanna. >> on chris wallace's show, they'll be remembering ten years. who else is coming up? >> we'll be talking to rand paul not only about obama care but on wednesday he went to d
% in popularity this year. >> the immigrants from egypt are moving here. thank you for coming. we really appreciate it. >> another name that made it korey with a "k." that is from "duck dynasty." 89%. korey with a "k." >>> we have the salvation army bell ringers with us. with us, kath's been distracted throughout the show. >> this is army major. when i did my podcast on saturday, i interviewed him for a good 10 or 15 minutes of the work of the salvation army. you never let on that you were going to come and be with us on monday. >> i'm so excited to come talk to you then and now be with you today. >> it's a shortened time between thanksgiving and christmas because thanksgiving came so late. we're reading you that guys are starting off in the hole. how much do you have to make up? >> five days short. $22.5 million. today is giving tuesday, really what we're trying to do is get the message out. we're so thankful for getting the message out. >> we have some of your band members here. we can't wait. are you guys going to come out ♪ >> oh. ♪ [ laughter ] >> oh, my goodness. >> that's call
and on the other hand, senate has passed some bills like immigration reform that have crawled to a halt in the house. now congress has passed some major legislation. things like the violence against women act. overall, what is going on here is divided government with sharply divided politics. it means all of these folks up here have one major accomplishment they share. this is the least productive congress in modern history. back to you. >> all right, lisa dejourdan. thank you. >>> coming up, the focus of our debate for you with the political panel. can lawmakers stop playing the blame game long enough to get a little bit of work done? panelists will break it down. >> and our fourth question, what about the markets this week? and the economy. well, there is plenty to look out for. zane asher is at the new york stock exchange. zane? >> deb, this upcoming week on wall street, we will introduce a brand new airline. well, kind of. american and u.s. air will merge into the biggest airline monday. ceos of the two companies will bring the nasdaq's opening bill. ticket will be aal. new name, am
immigration reform one of them, the enda bill that came out of there, but it's been a tough slog. you've got a few weeks left in the year, and the notion that this is going to be prioritized, there's going to be this push by bipartisan senators to get tougher sanctions on iran when the white house is explicitly saying no to me, that looks -- i just don't understand. is it the case that senators are going home to their states and people are standing up at town halls saying we need stronger sanctions on iran? why is this such a priority? >> listen, you have 47 million americans who have lost food stamp benefits, who are potentially going hungry this holiday season, you have farms that are going to shut down some time next year without a farm bill being passed. you're exactly right, there are bigger priorities. now, what my friends on both sides of the aisle will say is that, no, wait, we need to do this right now so that if the negotiations fall apart some time next year, we're right there immediately with tough, new sanctions. well, the fact is, we can pass things quicker than a lot of people
-american and latino communities. if you're not willing to deal with the issues of immigration, of affirmative action, of reform of our housing markets, then you're not really serious about the issues of race in america. >> well, what i find interesting politically about the republicans here is they don't have any point person that is going to get a lot of media attention, and focus on minority outreach. and research and clarification. they don't have a go-to person on this, which tells me that certainly they're not genuine about it at all. now, in may 2013 survey done by the pew research center found that 88% of african-americans and 57% of whites felt that there is at least some discrimination towards african-americans. are things getting better, or are they getting worse, zerlina? >> i don't think they're getting better. i wouldn't say that we are where we were in 1955. of course that's not true. but i think there are a number of different things. as michael pointed out, there are pervasive problems that exist in our society. you know, outcomes are not equal for people of color. when you are born,
in at least 15 with tips. 25-year-old andy kim who immigrated from south korea went through the program and is now a full-time stylist. >> first time i could have taken this very well, but a lot of people helped. >> reporter: he's making more than $30,000 a year but he knows there's great opportunity for growth in a high end salon like this. owner diane fisher says all it takes are the skills required along with hard work and a very nice salary could follow. >> there's been some that make 200,000 a year. >> reporter: styling hair? >> yes. >> reporter: what do you think about that? >> i think it's wonderful. it makes me feel really good. i love it! >> that was peggy fox reporting. local career counselor colleen smith says waiters at nice restaurants, temp workers and seasonal workers can make more than $15 an hour. >>> you've got problems and our wusa9 call for action team is getting results. we are solving consumer disputes across our area. a dishwasher was ordered online with installation from a big box retailer. when the workers came out to install it, they could see it was damaged
of two immigrants who come from india. decades earlier. we lifed in a house in bedford, massachusetts a middle class family. when i was five, my parents got divorced and my dad left. my mother was on her own having never held a job before. she faced going back to india, or going on welfare to support her two young children. in india, we would have been marked stigmatized. it was unheard of to get divorced back then. she knew our life opportunities would be limited. she made that tough choice. she stayed. we stayed. we were on welfare. we were on food stamps. we received housing vouchers to help pay for rent. but because of a series of events we were able to remain in bedford and i was able to go to the public schools. my mom eventually got at the job at the travel agent, and by the time i was 11, i'm proud to say that she bought her own house in bedford, massachusetts. my mom is an amazing woman who sacrificed a great deal for her children. but i know i'm here also because a lot of people were -- expand opportunity. it's hard a little bit to share my story. but i know we live in cynic
minorities, immigrants, people that are special ed, special needs, and yet and still they're among top performers in the world. we have to understand that the adults created this system. this is not about kids that get the trophies, this is about adults that are uncomfortable going home with a child that doesn't have a trophy, this is about the adult that doesn't want to sit home and help his or her child do a homework assignment that might take up too much of their night. we have to own that we the adults have to put our children first and create situations in which we push not just the children but the educators that sur ound them. too many of us are comfortable with mediocrity. as michelle said, the rest of the world is moving forward. we haven't dropped, we're just losing in a race because we're not moving forward. >> frank talk from steve perry and michelle reed on this important issue. >>> we have much more ahead in the cnn newsroom and it all starts right now.
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)